Frequently Asked Questions

Have you got some questions about engineering? Check out the FAQ below for some answers to many common questions asked by people who are either considering studying engineering or current students. If you have any other questions that are not answered here, don’t hesitate to contact us.

What is the Washington Accord?

The Washington accord is an agreement between selected governing bodies around the World that provide engineering degree accreditation. It provides assurance that if your engineering degree is awarded by one of its members, your degree is then recognised by all other members in the Washington Accord. For example if your degree is accredited by the National Board of Accreditation (India) then it is also recognised by ABET (United States). See the full list of current members of the Washington Accord below:

International Engineering Alliance

The one that you are the most interested in! Engineering can be difficult enough and we strongly encourage you to choose a course that draws you in due to enjoyment, curiosity or love of the subjects. You may feel distressed in choosing between the hundreds of narrow field before you have studied any type of engineering before. We recommend choosing one of the four major disciplines at first and look at specialising later on.

Engineering is inherently slow paced and detail oriented. The nature of engineering is not quite as attention grabbing as the get rich quick strategies, social pranks and advertising that is thrown in our faces.

The engineering community has been very poor at self promotion and lags behind some other fields, being slowly pushed aside from social media and pop culture. We hope you can join us in reversing this process by learning to better promote engineering through new forms of media.

Choosing to either finish your degree or dropping out early. Many students cause problems for themselves by either dropping out too early before they really get involved in the course or they hang around for too long, failing subjects and increasing their debt when they are probably better suited to another field.

Yes only in some countries. Other countries require an additional qualification or licence which may be obtained after working for many years in the industry. At this point you can then apply for a Professional Engineering licence (sometimes called Chartered Engineering status).

At the current time it is Petroleum Engineering. However, this really should be irrelevant information to you. The engineering career you should choose is the one which is most interesting to you on a deeply personal level. The more motivated you are and the more enjoyment you find in your work, the more money and success you will eventually have.